GlaxoSmithKline tops 2012 Access to Medicines Index

GlaxoSmithKline, one of the world’s leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, has ranked highest in the Access to Medicines (ATM) Index for the third time.

GlaxoSmithKline, one of the world’s leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, has ranked highest in the Access to Medicines (ATM) Index for the third time.

The ATM Index measures the top 20 pharmaceutical companies on their efforts to improve access to medicines and healthcare in developing countries.

GSK has ranked top of the index three times since it began in 2008. This year, the company scored highest for general access to medicine management, research and development activity, capability advancement, drug donation and philanthropy.

“GSK is committed to finding new and innovative ways to ensure access to medicines across Africa,” said East Africa General Manager John Musunga. “We are collaborating with government, NGOs and other private-sector companies to improve people’s health and well-being no matter where they live while continuing to expand our business and invest in research.”

Over the past five years, GSK has made fundamental changes to its business model including re-investing 20% of all profits in the least developed countries to help communities strengthen their local health infrastructure.

The ATM Index provides an overall ranking of 20 pharmaceutical companies who are measured across a range of strategic and technical areas. It ranks individual pharmaceutical companies on their efforts to enhance global access to medicines across seven categories: drug donation and philanthropy, capability advancement, patents and licensing, equitable pricing, research and development, public policy, and general access to medicines management. It also analyses industry trends in commitments, transparency, performance and innovation.

The ATM Index is an initiative of the Access to Medicines Foundation, an international not-for-profit organisation established in 2004 to improve access to medicines.

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