Amnesty International policy: sex workers v Hollywood stars

As the debate over sex work heats up, Amnesty International must listen to sex workers, not Hollywood stars, and finalise its draft policy calling for decriminalisation of sex work.

As the debate over sex work heats up, Amnesty International must listen to sex workers, not Hollywood stars, and finalise its draft policy calling for decriminalisation of sex work.

The video below tells the story of Nicole Adams, 27, who says: “I am a sex worker, proud and radical sex worker, feminist as well as lobbyist for SWEAT [Sex Workers Education & Advocacy Taskforce].”

As a teenager, Nicole was sexually abused. “My eldest daughter is my stepfather’s child and my middle one my uncle’s and the last one is gang rape but that didn’t stop me from going and standing on the streets and selling myself for sex,” says Nicole. “Because in the end of the day it brought food on my table, it brought food into my babies’ stomachs and it put them in school.”

Criminalising sex workers makes them incredibly vulnerable to abuse, both from clients, and often the police. Amnesty’s draft policy takes a human-rights approach and is based on evidence gained from speaking to sex workers. Decriminalising sex workers would give them better access to justice and protection from abusers. It would also improve their access to healthcare, helping avoid unwanted pregnancies and transmission of HIV.

Sign the petition

Sign SWEAT’s petition and help decriminalise sex work now!

This video was produced by Key Correspondents Sungano Bondayi and Amanda Luyenge

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